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Sunday, 16 November 2008

Party in my Shoes: Thailand's Jungle Leeches - Page 2

Written by Amy C. Rankin
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My birthday found me mid-jungle at the border of Burma and Thailand. I had a bit of a party, with native monkeys and various vermin celebrating with me.  I was just a girl and a backpack, trying to forget about things like passing birthdays.

Gning and Gnung, my two Thai tour guides warned me about the "tiny buffalo" or what the hill tribes termed the “tiny beasts” one must grapple with in order to get from place to place;  the masses of slimy black jungle leeches.

 

Party in my Shoes: Thailand’s Jungle Leeches, Karen people, Mae Hong Son, Burmese refugee, tiny buffalo, slimy black jungle leeches, Karen village, Amy C. RankinThe interesting story about the Karen people is this is not their original home. They are refugees from Burma (this settlement was in Mae Hong Son, a few miles from the border). If you scan a newspaper, you might find a tiny section about the current situation in Burma (Myanmar). I assure you it is front-page news in the Bangkok post. Growing these meager rice paddies on a jungle mountaintop was their only hope of escape from the Burmese Government who was killing them and stealing their land. The Thai Government is tolerant of the refugees for now, as long as they stick to their mountaintops and do not leave without permission. Indeed, every bus I rode had police checkpoints for the military to ensure that every passenger was legal. My Ohio Drivers License was enough proof for them that indeed I was not a Burmese refugee.



"Welcome to five star hotel!" exclaimed Gnung, laughing again.



Party in my Shoes: Thailand’s Jungle Leeches, Karen people, Mae Hong Son, Burmese refugee, tiny buffalo, slimy black jungle leeches, Karen village, Amy C. RankinThe amenities of the "home" included one waterspout, a shower (i.e. a rubber hose running from said spout into a straw covered outhouse) complete with swampy mud floor and squatter toilet. For sleeping, there were straw mats with mosquito nets that were brought out just for the tourists.



At night, if you find that sleep does not come, you can stay up and be serenaded by a chorus of monkeys singing and swinging in the treetops. And if sleep STILL doesn't come, you can always wait until dawn when the roosters insist upon squawking their heads off every two minutes until everyone in the house is tossing about,  scratching their heads and wondering why the heck they signed up for this.

 


Now, safely out of the jungle, I realize why I signed up for it...because it makes for great storytelling, and that's what it's all about.

 

Party in my Shoes: Thailand’s Jungle Leeches, Karen people, Mae Hong Son, Burmese refugee, tiny buffalo, slimy black jungle leeches, Karen village, Amy C. Rankin

©Amy C. Rankin

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Last modified on Sunday, 16 December 2012

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