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Monday, 23 March 2009

MIS: Mexican International Speedway

Written by  Kent V. Flowers
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There are only slight differences in driving techniques employed by the average Mexican driver and those by the professional auto racing circuit. The similarities far outweigh the differences. Everyone is driving as fast as possible in an attempt to gain the pole position. It is only a relative pole position, because there is still always someone in front of you, but you get internal points for every car you pass.

There are only slight differences in driving techniques employed by the average Mexican driver and those by the professional auto racing circuit. The similarities far outweigh the differences. Everyone is driving as fast as possible in an attempt to gain the pole position. It is only a relative pole position, because there is still always someone in front of you, but you get internal points for every car you pass.

 

At least in NASCAR, there are officials who wave caution flags when there is danger on the track. The only flags waved on a Mexican highway are the ones used to flag down buses that then swerve through as many lanes as it takes to pick up the passenger waving them down. The bus driver will nonchalantly force a family of 5 into a ditch to collect a 10-peso fare. A further purpose is served, in that the uninjured in the party of 5 will now need to take a bus to their destination. The injured, of course, are now the responsibility of the state.

 

I like driving in Mexico. Skill is much more of a factor and adrenaline pumps through me as I swoop down the turn into the straightaway. Vigilance is required to keep from being run off the road.

 

MIS, Mexican International Speedway, Mexican highway, driving in mexico, San Luis Potosi, Kent V. FlowersBefore coming to work in San Luis Potosi I was told that Mexicans lived a more relaxed existence than their northern neighbors. There is no hurry or hectic pace in the population. They move a little slower, come in to work a little later, take longer lunches and enjoy themselves in a jovial, gregarious style. Until they get into a car that is.

 

One of the cornerstone laws in physics, known as the law of conservation of energy, is that energy can never be destroyed or created; it can only be transformed. I believe that the life force within us is endowed with a similar property. MIS, Mexican International Speedway, Mexican highway, driving in mexico, San Luis Potosi, Kent V. FlowersIf we live our lives in a subdued manner, never utilizing the full force of energy that resides in us, the excess energy is not lost - it is just transformed. It is one of the reasons people go to war or create magnificent works of art. In the case of the Mexican driver, all the pent up energy left over from their lifestyle is channeled into their driving style. What did they do before there were cars? I refer back to going to war or creating art.

 

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Last modified on Sunday, 16 December 2012

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